Allain Duhangan Hydropower project, India

A first class candidate to CDM credits for India, the hydro scheme developed with Norwegian funds, WB and IFC causes opposition for disrupting local economies and water sources. But with little displacement, thus no compensation measures at sight.


Description

Allain Duhangan Hydroelectric Project (ADHP) was proposed by AD Hydro Power Ltd. (ADPL); it is a run-of-the-river 192 MW hydro power project at the confluence of Allain & Duhangan rivulets at Prini village (closed to Manali and Jagatsukh towns) of Kullu district in Himachal Pradesh state of India. The area is very well known for prosperous agriculture (especially apple orchards) and touristic attractions, including trekking and skying facilities.

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Basic Data
NameAllain Duhangan Hydropower project, India
CountryIndia
ProvinceKullu district, Himachal Pradesh
SitePrini village (closed to Manali town)
Accuracy of LocationHIGH local level
Source of Conflict
Type of Conflict (1st level)Water Management
Type of Conflict (2nd level)Dams and water distribution conflicts
REDD/CDM
Land acquisition conflicts
Specific CommoditiesLand
Electricity
Water
Project Details and Actors
Project DetailsGeneration capacity: 192MW

The project requires a portion of the Allain and Duhangan rivers to be diverted through tunnels to an underground power house to two 96MW generating units. A small diversion structure on the Allain River will supply water to an off-stream storage reservoir. That, together with water storage in both tunnels, will provide capacity for four hours of peaking generation during dry periods.

Power is transmitted to an existing substation at Nalagarh through a 180km-long and 220KV transmission line, from where it is transmitted to Rajasthan by a power grid. The transmission line has two sections, the snow zone from Prini to Panarsa and the non-snow zone from Panarsa to Nalagarh.

About 15% of the electricity is being provided to Himachal Pradesh State Electricity Board (HPSEB) free of cost for the first 12 years, after which the supply will be increased to 20%.[4]

The project involves the construction of a barrage, forebay reservoir, head works, a de-silting basin, head race tunnel for both Allain and Duhangan streams terminating at storage reservoir, steel lined pressure shafts (partly inclined and partly horizontal), and an underground power house for 2 generating units, each of 96 MW capacity, tail race tunnel and an outdoor switchyard. The combined flows of the two rivers via a 1.69 km long pressure shaft will feed a single powerhouse with 2 units each of 96 MW capacity to be located in a rock cavern. The water from the powerhouse will be led back to Allain stream through a tailrace tunnel followed by an open channel. [2]
Level of Investment (in USD)192,000,000
Type of PopulationRural
Start Date2008
Company Names or State EnterprisesAllain Duhangan Power Company Limited from India - Allain Duhangan Power Company Limited (ADPCL) is jointly owned by Rajasthan Spinning & Weaving Mills Limited (RSWM), HEG Limited (HEG) and Malana Power Company Limited (MPCL). These sponsor companies are part of the LNJ Bhilwara (LNJ) group having a 45% stake in the project. The IFC (International Finance Corporation) owns 12% and has contributed around $45m to the project, while SN Power has a 43% indirect ownership. [4]
Bhilwara Energy Limited from India - The Allain Duhangan Hydro Project Limited (ADHPL) is a subsidiary of Malana Power Company Limited, a joint venture between Bhilwara Energy Limited and Norway’s SN Power.
Malana Power Company Limited from India - The Allain Duhangan Hydro Project Limited (ADHPL) is a subsidiary of Malana Power Company Limited, a joint venture between Bhilwara Energy Limited and Norway’s SN Power.
AECOM from Canada - Consultancy service
Rajasthan Spinning & Weaving Mills Limited from India - Allain Duhangan Power Company Limited (ADPCL) is jointly owned by Rajasthan Spinning & Weaving Mills Limited (RSWM), HEG Limited (HEG) and Malana Power Company Limited (MPCL).
Sn Power from Norway
Relevant government actorsHimachal Pradesh State Electricity Board (HPSEB)
International and Financial InstitutionsItalian Carbon Fund from Italy
United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change/CDM (UNFCC)
Clean Development Mechanism Executive Board (CDM Executive Board)
Power Finance Corporation (PFC) from India
Corporación financiera internacional,
Environmental justice organisations and other supportersKalpavriksh, SANDRP, International Rivers
The Conflict and the Mobilization
Intensity of Conflict (at highest level)MEDIUM (street protests, visible mobilization)
When did the mobilization beginPREVENTIVE resistance (precautionary phase)
Groups MobilizingFarmers
Fishermen
International ejos
Local ejos
Social movements
Forms of MobilizationDevelopment of a network/collective action
Media based activism/alternative media
Objections to the EIA
Official complaint letters and petitions
Street protest/marches
Impacts
Environmental ImpactsVisible: Loss of landscape/aesthetic degradation, Soil erosion, Deforestation and loss of vegetation cover, Surface water pollution / Decreasing water (physico-chemical, biological) quality, Groundwater pollution or depletion, Large-scale disturbance of hydro and geological systems, Reduced ecological / hydrological connectivity
Potential: Food insecurity (crop damage), Global warming
Health ImpactsVisible: Accidents, Occupational disease and accidents
Socio-economic ImpactsVisible: Displacement, Loss of livelihood, Land dispossession, Loss of landscape/sense of place
Potential: Specific impacts on women
Outcome
Project StatusIn operation
Pathways for conflict outcome / responseMigration/displacement
Development of AlternativesSANDRP, together with many other EJOs, advocates for a comprehensive review of hydropower plans in the Himalayas, arguing the current programs by the state are not sustainable and might lead to more disasters as the one witnessed in June 2013 [10].
Do you consider this as a success?No
Why? Explain briefly.Despite all criticism regarding the impacts and the CDM related uncertainties, the plant has been constructed and is currently operating.
Sources and Materials
References

SANDRP, Comments on the ESIA of The Proposed Allain Duhangan HEP in Kulu district in HP
[click to view]

[3] Mountains of Concrete
[click to view]

[8] Comments on the ESIA of The Proposed Allain Duhangan HEP
[click to view]

Environmental and Social Impact Assessment: 192 MW Hydroelectric Power Project, Tehsil Manali, District Kullu, Himachal Pradesh
[click to view]

Environmental & Social Management and Monitoring Plan
[click to view]

Links

[4] Power-technology.com
[click to view]

[5] SN Power
[click to view]

[9] SANDRP, The 75 million dollar fraud
[click to view]

[10] EJOLT blog, Supreme Court of India slams the building of megadams
[click to view]

[1] Carbon Finance Unit
[click to view]

[2] Damming a Global Heritage
[click to view]

[6] Complain letter from local affected peoples' representatives to the IFC Ombudsman
[click to view]

[7] Affected People to World Bank Regarding Allain Duhangan Hydro Project
[click to view]

Media Links

Video on AECOM for the Canadian Consulting Engineering Awards
[click to view]

Other Documents

View on the plant Source: SN Power
[click to view]

Meta Information
ContributorDaniela Del Bene, ICTA - UAB (d.delbene-at-gmail.com)
Last update19/11/2015
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