Firestone/Bridgestone Rubber Plantations, Liberia

Description

Firestones plantation - established in 1926 and leased for 99 years - is among the worlds largest rubber plantations. The area it now covers --a coastal low-land, interspersed with marshes, creeks and streams-- was originally owned and inhabited by the Mamba Bassa tribes who were evicted from there by the Firestone Plantations Company and the Government of Liberia during the signing of concession agreement without benefits to these local inhabitants.

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Basic Data
NameFirestone/Bridgestone Rubber Plantations, Liberia
CountryLiberia
ProvinceMonrovia
SiteMonrovia
Accuracy of LocationMEDIUM regional level
Source of Conflict
Type of Conflict (1st level)Biomass and Land Conflicts (Forests, Agriculture and Livestock Management)
Type of Conflict (2nd level)Plantation conflicts (incl. Pulp
Mineral processing
REDD/CDM
Specific CommoditiesRubber
Land
Project Details and Actors
Project DetailsThe 405, 000 hectares of land was leased for a fee of six cents per acre for a total annual price of $60,000. In 2005, Firestone signed a new 37-year agreement with the Transitional Government in Liberia to lease the land for a fee of fifty cents per acre. Between 2000 and 2003 Firestone exported 167,165 tons of rubber. In 2007, Firestone received $81,242,190 from its production in Liberia.
Project Area (in hectares)405000
Type of PopulationRural
Start Date1926
Company Names or State EnterprisesBridgestone from Japan
Firestone
Relevant government actorsGovernment of Liberia
Environmental justice organisations and other supportersThe Association of Environmental Lawyers of Liberia (Green Advocates), President Alfred Lahai Brownell, http://www.greenadvocates.org/, International Rights Advocates, http://iradvocates.org/index.html
The Conflict and the Mobilization
Intensity of Conflict (at highest level)UNKNOWN
When did the mobilization beginUNKNOWN
Groups MobilizingIndustrial workers
International ejos
Local ejos
Neighbours/citizens/communities
Forms of MobilizationCreation of alternative reports/knowledge
Involvement of national and international NGOs
Lawsuits, court cases, judicial activism
Media based activism/alternative media
Official complaint letters and petitions
Public campaigns
Brownells research work with plantation workers influenced an Alien Tort Claims Act case filed against Firestone in the United States.
Impacts
Environmental ImpactsVisible: Air pollution, Biodiversity loss (wildlife, agro-diversity), Loss of landscape/aesthetic degradation, Surface water pollution / Decreasing water (physico-chemical, biological) quality
Potential: Deforestation and loss of vegetation cover, Groundwater pollution or depletion
Health ImpactsVisible: Malnutrition, Mental problems including stress, depression and suicide, Violence related health impacts (homicides, rape, etc..) , Health problems related to alcoholism, prostitution, Occupational disease and accidents, Deaths
Potential: Exposure to unknown or uncertain complex risks (radiation, etc…)
Socio-economic ImpactsVisible: Lack of work security, labour absenteeism, firings, unemployment, Social problems (alcoholism, prostitution, etc..), Violations of human rights
Potential: Increase in violence and crime
Outcome
Project StatusIn operation
Do you consider this as a success?No
Why? Explain briefly...
Sources and Materials
References

Firestone: The Mark Of Slavery (to see the full report: ).
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Links

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Meta Information
ContributorTeresa Perez
Last update18/08/2014
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