Protest against the planned Qingshuihe Waste Incineration Power Plant, Luohu District, Shenzhen, China

On 8th January 2006, residents of Qingshuihe took to the streets to protest against the plan of the local authority to expand a waste incinerator. There is also a landfill.


Description
Incinerators in China have an image problem: they are connected to worsening environment and falling house prices. This  conflict case in Shenzen is one more instance. Shenzhen is a fast growing modern city near Hong Kong. Forty years ago, Shezhen was just a fishing village. In 2006  residents of Shenzhen in  Guangdong Province were stepping up their campaign against a waste incineration power station near a residential area. On 8th January 2006, residents living around Qingshuihe waste incineration power plant which was the first such facility in China took to the street to protest against the plan of the local authority to expand the plant. The protesters blockaded the road and paralyzed the traffic for more than three hours.  According to the planning of Shenzhen government, an environmental "park" would be built in Qingshuihe which consisted of a number of waste treatment facilities including a new large incineration power plant, which further added to the grievances of residents living in surrounding communities. However, ten years later, the planned project has not been completed yet. About 3,000 people had taken part in that street protest in January 2006 over the incinerator which they claimed emits cancer-causing pollution, and also protested with banners. Residents sought help from members of the annual session of Shenzhen Municipal Committee of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC) to have the plant closed down. Local inhabitants argued that medical experts had reached common ground that garbage incineration generates dioxins that can cause cancer. The area, Qingshuihe in Louhou district,  was in a relatively outlying area when the government first established the facility. However, the city grew so fast that the site was now close to the downtown area, and property developers  built several residential quarters around the waste incineration plant. It was argued that the environmental elements had not been taken into the consideration in the city planning and that the government's environmental department could do little to affect the decision of the city planning department.  [1]    In the same location within the Xiaping Landfill site in the Qingshuihe River area, Luohu District,a CDM project was established, collecting methane from the land fill, and getting carbon credits. [2]   In April 2016 it was reported that  the Qingshuihe waste landfill  called a halt to accepting garbage [3] because it was full.  It has received "prizes" for bad smelling.  [4]               
Basic Data
NameProtest against the planned Qingshuihe Waste Incineration Power Plant, Luohu District, Shenzhen, China
CountryChina
ProvinceGuangdong
SiteShenzhen
Accuracy of LocationMEDIUM regional level
Source of Conflict
Type of Conflict (1st level)Waste Management
Type of Conflict (2nd level)Incinerators
REDD/CDM
Specific CommoditiesDomestic municipal waste
Electricity
Industrial waste
Project Details and Actors
Project Details Qingshuihe River area, Luohu District, a garbage incinerator was planned and a landfill collecting and burning methane (carbon credits) was built. Protests against the incinetator escalated in 2006. Ten years later, it was reported [3] that "the city government released a work plan to enhance the prevention of waste pollution. The plan specifies that real estate projects shall not be built near waste disposal sites... the government will evaluate the pollution status of five municipal waste disposal facilities on Qingshuihe, Honghualing, Laohukeng, Pingshan and Baigehe and will come up with technical plans to improve environmental management in these areas by the end of next year. The work plan notes that real estate projects, schools, hospitals and other densely populated buildings shall not be constructed near household waste landfills, garbage incinerators or sludge disposal plants. Environmental quality monitors will be installed near household waste landfills, garbage incinerators and sludge disposal plants."
Type of PopulationUrban
Start Date01/2006
Relevant government actorsShenzhen city planning department

Shenzhen environmental department
Environmental justice organisations and other supportersMunicipal Committee of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC)
The Conflict and the Mobilization
Intensity of Conflict (at highest level)MEDIUM (street protests, visible mobilization)
When did the mobilization beginPREVENTIVE resistance (precautionary phase)
Groups MobilizingLocal government/political parties
Neighbours/citizens/communities
Local scientists/professionals
Forms of MobilizationBlockades
Street protest/marches
Impacts
Environmental ImpactsVisible: Air pollution
Health ImpactsVisible: Exposure to unknown or uncertain complex risks (radiation, etc…)
Potential: Other environmental related diseases
OtherAlledged threat of dioxin
OtherAn incinerator planned in an area that had become residential
Outcome
Project StatusStopped
Pathways for conflict outcome / responseProject cancelled
Development of AlternativesIt is reported in 2016 that Shenzhen will build the largest and most modern world incinerator, http://china.org.cn/environment/2016-03/15/content_38028774.htm
Do you consider this as a success?Yes
Why? Explain briefly.The incinerator was stopped because of the protests. There is a landfill in Qingshuihe which is also controversial.
Sources and Materials
Links

[1] Residents Slam Waste Incineration Power Station , China Daily March 23, 2006.
[click to view]

[2] MONITORING REPORT. Version 06. Date: 01/06/2012. Shenzhen Xiaping Landfill Gas Collection and Utilization Project. CDM Registration reference number: 0887
[click to view]

Media Links

[3] City to improve management of waste disposal sites
2016-September-30 . Shenzhen Daily
[click to view]

[4],Shenzhen Residents Protest “Smelliest Landfill in History” By Giving it an Award. Natalie Wang. June 2, 2014.
[click to view]

Other Documents

Photo: Takefoto, Phoenix News
[click to view]

Meta Information
Last update30/11/2016
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