Shell Bonga Oil Spill, Nigeria


Description
In November 2005, The Shell Nigeria Exploration and Production Company Limited (SNEPCo) began to produce oil and gas at Bonga, 120 kilometres (km) offshore Nigeria in the Gulf of Guinea. The project the countrys first in deep water increased Nigerias oil capacity by 10%. First discovered in 1995, Bonga lies in water 1,000 metres deep across an area of 60 square km. It has the capacity to produce more than 200,000 barrels of oil a day and 150 million standard cubic feet of gas a day. .
See more...
Basic Data
NameShell Bonga Oil Spill, Nigeria
CountryNigeria
SiteNiger Delta Deep Water
Accuracy of LocationLOW country/state level
Source of Conflict
Type of Conflict (1st level)Fossil Fuels and Climate Justice/Energy
Type of Conflict (2nd level)Oil and gas exploration and extraction
Pollution related to transport (spills, dust, emissions)
Specific CommoditiesCrude oil
Project Details and Actors
Project DetailsFirst discovered in 1995, Bonga lies in water 1,000 metres deep across an area of 60 square km. It has the capacity to produce more than 200,000 barrels of oil a day and 150 million standard cubic feet of gas a day. .
Project Area (in hectares)95,000
Type of PopulationRural
Start Date20/12/2012
Company Names or State EnterprisesShell Nigeria Exploration and Production Company from Nigeria
Royal Dutch Shell from Netherlands
Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC) from Nigeria
Environmental justice organisations and other supportersEnvironmental Rights Action, Rural Environmental Action Team, Oilwatch Africa., Trade Unions, Artisan Fishermen Association of Nigeria
The Conflict and the Mobilization
Intensity of Conflict (at highest level)HIGH (widespread, mass mobilization, violence, arrests, etc...)
When did the mobilization beginMobilization for reparations once impacts have been felt
Groups MobilizingFishermen
Indigenous groups or traditional communities
Local ejos
Neighbours/citizens/communities
Social movements
Trade unions
Women
Local scientists/professionals
Forms of MobilizationCommunity-based participative research (popular epidemiology studies, etc..)
Creation of alternative reports/knowledge
Development of alternative proposals
Involvement of national and international NGOs
Land occupation
Media based activism/alternative media
Official complaint letters and petitions
Public campaigns
Appeals/recourse to economic valuation of the environment
Impacts
Environmental ImpactsVisible: Biodiversity loss (wildlife, agro-diversity), Food insecurity (crop damage), Loss of landscape/aesthetic degradation, Oil spills, Surface water pollution / Decreasing water (physico-chemical, biological) quality, Groundwater pollution or depletion
Potential: Air pollution, Fires, Floods (river, coastal, mudflow), Genetic contamination, Soil contamination, Soil erosion, Waste overflow, Large-scale disturbance of hydro and geological systems, Reduced ecological / hydrological connectivity
Health ImpactsVisible: Exposure to unknown or uncertain complex risks (radiation, etc…)
Potential: Malnutrition, Mental problems including stress, depression and suicide, Infectious diseases, Other environmental related diseases
Socio-economic ImpactsVisible: Displacement, Lack of work security, labour absenteeism, firings, unemployment, Loss of livelihood, Loss of traditional knowledge/practices/cultures, Land dispossession, Loss of landscape/sense of place
Potential: Violations of human rights
Outcome
Project StatusIn operation
Pathways for conflict outcome / responseMigration/displacement
Negotiated alternative solution
New legislation
Under negotiation
Application of existing regulations
New Environmental Impact Assessment/Study
Development of Alternatives. The Nigerian government should compel Shell to state the actual amounts of oil spewed from its facility.

2. The Nigeria government should conduct an independent investigation of Shells claims that only 40,000 barrels of crude was spewed, and compel Shell to pay adequately for the damage done.

3. Shell should be levied an administrative Fine to the damages done to the environment and local people.

4. An independent verification and cleaning up of existing mess (all over the Niger Delta) onshore and offshore should be the focus of NOSDRA and other regulatory agencies.
Do you consider this as a success?No
Why? Explain briefly.As a result of the spill, the livelihood of the local communities along 120 kilometres of coast adjacent to Bonga has been truncated, due to contamination of their open water, loss of employment, as people are mainly fisher folks, which has led to incidence of the migration of the people from these communities in search of fresh water.
Sources and Materials
Legislations

Nigeria Federal Government agencies, such as NESREA and NOSDRA. NESREA (National Environmental Standards and Regulation Agency) has responsibility for the protection and development of the environment, biodiversity conservation and sustainable development of Nigerias natural resources in general and environmental technology including coordination, and liaison with, relevant stakeholders within and outsider Nigeria on maters of enforcement of environmental standards, regulations, rules, laws policies and guidelines

References

NESREA ACT, Federal Republic of Nigeria Official Gazette. No.92, Vol 94. Lagos ,31st July, 2007.

Annual Statistical Bulletin 2011.: A publication of Nigeria National Petroleum Corporation,

Links

[click to view]

[click to view]

[click to view]

[click to view]

[click to view]

[click to view]

[click to view]

[click to view]

[click to view]

[click to view]

[click to view]

[1] Field Report #282: Shell’s Bonga spill spreads to Odioama
[click to view]

[2] Field Report #284: Shell’s Bonga spill reaches two communities in Ekeremor
[click to view]

Media Links

[click to view]

[click to view]

[click to view]

[click to view]

[click to view]

Meta Information
ContributorGodwin Uyi Ojo
Last update13/01/2015
Comments