Last update:
2018-01-10

Fracking and flooding in Fares, Egypt

In 2008 oil company DanaGas set off explosives to assess rock formations for fracking. Soon after the explosions, contaminated waters started to rise out of the ground, destroying farms, trees, water supplies and homes in the nearby village of Fares.


Description:

The village of Fares lies in the middle of the vast Kom Ombo oil drilling concession and is home to approximately 25,000 residents. Most of UAE-based oil company Dana Gas’ drilling and oil extraction lies only 11 kilometres away in the Baraka field. One well was sunk immediately next to New Fares, six kilometres west of the village proper.

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Basic Data
Name of conflict: Fracking and flooding in Fares, Egypt
Country:Egypt
State or province:Aswan
Location of conflict:Fares
Accuracy of locationMEDIUM (Regional level)
Source of Conflict
Type of conflict. 1st level:Fossil Fuels and Climate Justice/Energy
Type of conflict. 2nd level:Shale gas fracking
Specific commodities:Crude oil
Natural Gas
Project Details and Actors
Project details

Production at Al-Baraka Field is derived from 12 wells (all located in the main field area) within a total of 14 including exploration and development wells.

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Type of populationRural
Start of the conflict:01/01/2008
Company names or state enterprises:Dana Gas Egypt from Egypt
Mediterra Energy from Canada - In 2014, Dana Gas sold its remaining 50% stake in Kom Ombo concession, including the Al Baraka and West Al Baraka oil fields, to Mediterra Energy, a subsidiary of Sea Dragon Energy Inc, for around $6.3 million in cash.
Sea Dragon Energy Inc - In 2014, Dana Gas sold its remaining 50% stake in Kom Ombo concession, including the Al Baraka and West Al Baraka oil fields, to Mediterra Energy, a subsidiary of Sea Dragon Energy Inc, for around $6.3 million in cash.
Madison Petrogas from Canada - In 2014, Dana Gas sold its remaining 50% stake in Kom Ombo concession, including the Al Baraka and West Al Baraka oil fields, to Mediterra Energy, a subsidiary of Sea Dragon Energy Inc, for around $6.3 million in cash. In October 2015, Sea Dragon Energy Inc. was acquired by Madison Petrogas Ltd.,
Relevant government actors:Ministry of Petroleum
Ganope, among with the Egyptian Environmental Affairs Agency (EEAA), is responsible for ensuring that all drilling practices performed in Aswan abide by strict environmental preservation laws.
Environmental justice organizations (and other supporters) and their websites, if available:Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights (EIPR)
Conflict & Mobilization
IntensityUnknown
Reaction stageMobilization for reparations once impacts have been felt
Groups mobilizing:Farmers
Local ejos
Neighbours/citizens/communities
Forms of mobilization:Lawsuits, court cases, judicial activism
Media based activism/alternative media
Public campaigns
Impacts
Environmental ImpactsVisible: Floods (river, coastal, mudflow), Food insecurity (crop damage), Loss of landscape/aesthetic degradation, Soil contamination, Soil erosion, Waste overflow, Surface water pollution / Decreasing water (physico-chemical, biological) quality, Groundwater pollution or depletion, Large-scale disturbance of hydro and geological systems
Health ImpactsPotential: Exposure to unknown or uncertain complex risks (radiation, etc…)
Socio-economical ImpactsVisible: Displacement, Lack of work security, labour absenteeism, firings, unemployment, Loss of livelihood, Loss of landscape/sense of place
Outcome
Project StatusIn operation
Conflict outcome / response:Compensation
Migration/displacement
Development of alternatives:EIPR demanded that an immediate moratorium be placed on the practice until Egypt had governmental institutions capable of properly overlooking the details of all drilling practices, and closing many of the potential loopholes in the bureaucratic process.
Do you consider this an environmental justice success? Was environmental justice served?:No
Briefly explain:Since the flooding began, Dana Gas has refused outright to provide any compensation or support that might remedy the problem, stating explicitly that it would not do anything which might imply that it holds any responsibility for causing the damage.
At this stage it is unclear what approach the new owners of the concession will take, when dealing with the residents of Fares and their demands.
Sources & Materials

(1) Is fracking responsible for the flooding of an Upper Egyptian village?
[click to view]

(3) Dana Gas Komombo Concession, Egypt Investigative Study of the Hydraulic Fracturing and Seismic Activities Conducted by DANA GAS
[click to view]

(2) The Flooding of Fares – are oil companies destroying an Egyptian village?
[click to view]

Meta information
Contributor:AWK
Last update18/08/2019
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